Wealth Creation By Natural Farming: Samriddhi

Agriculture is a civilizational approach to fulfilling the basic needs of humanity. In India, the cultivators of food are becoming victims of malnutrition. Bhavyata Foundation is promoting the ‘Samriddhi’ campaign to educate and empower farmers for crop productivity with cost-effective natural inputs. Natural farming brings sustainability to agriculture-based livelihood and reduces the costs of cultivation, thereby increasing net incomes of the small and marginal farmers. The campaign’s objective is to educate and empower farmers for crop productivity with cost-effective natural inputs. In collaboration with Bansi Gir Gaushala, we are dedicated to enhancing livelihoods and sustainable support to marginal farmers with smaller landholdings.

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Currently, small and neglected farmers representing 85 percent of farming households in India face rising input costs, debt stagnation, climate change impacts, and low returns. We support farmers from tribal districts of Palghar, Thane, Gadchiroll, Raigad, and many districts in Odisha. These are dependent upon high input fertilizers and pesticides for crop productivity and successful harvest. We support them with free inputs of fertilizers, called “Gau Krupa” developed by Bansir Gir Gaushala. These are bacterial fertilizers, chemical-free, perpetually made available, and locally developed.

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SAMRIDDHI – Wealth Creation by Natural Farming

Natural farming brings sustainability to agriculture-based livelihood and reduces the costs of cultivation, thereby increasing net incomes of the small and marginal farmers. The campaign’s objective is to educate and empower farmers for crop productivity with cost-effective natural inputs.

Agriculture is a civilizational approach to fulfilling the basic needs of humanity. In India, ironically, the cultivators of food are becoming victims of malnutrition. India’s rich agricultural tradition had brought a bounty of the harvest in the pre-colonial era. As per British Records, in Madras Presidency, between 1762 and 1766 some villages produced up to 12 tons of paddy a hectare(4.85 tons an acre), which is equivalent to best produce applying Green Revolution technologies, later proven to be environmentally disastrous.

Bhavyata Foundation, under its initiative, Sowing the Seeds is promoting the ‘Samriddhi’ campaign to educate and empower farmers for crop productivity with cost-effective natural inputs. Experts say, natural farming brings sustainability to agriculture-based livelihood and reduces the costs of cultivation, thereby increasing net incomes of the small and marginal farmers.

In collaboration with Bansi Gir Gaushala, National Kamdhenu Award Winner, 2017, the Foundation is dedicated to enhancing livelihoods and sustainable support to marginal farmers with smaller landholdings to make their returns viable. Also, a concerted effort to improve soil fertility and to improve groundwater capacities through tested techniques of natural farming is introduced by way of free training and professional consultation.

Currently, small and neglected farmers representing 85 per cent of farming households in India face rising input costs, debt stagnation, climate change impacts and low returns. Our beneficiaries include farmers from tribal district of Palghar, Thane, Gadchiroll, Raigad and many districts in Odisha. These are dependent upon high input fertilizers and pesticides for crop productivity and successful harvest. We support them with free inputs of fertilizers, which are bacterial fertilizers, chemical-free, perpetually made available and locally developed. Popularly known as “Gau Krupa”, the bacterial culture is developed by Bansi Gir Gaushala from panchgavya products and completely natural & Ayurvedic herbs. It is a result of our extensive research and experimentation. This culture has over 40 different strains of friendly bacteria which boost plant growth and immunity.

Many farmers have yielded bountiful harvests, and in some cases, even more than with the use of conventional chemical fertilizers and harmful pesticides. Thus they have reduced their input costs by a considerable margin, adding that straight to their fruitful incomes. 8 Farmers from Vakalvadi village, Murbad Taluka, Dist. Thane, Maharashtra and 155 farmers from Kumbhistu, Nihali, Naane, Bhopivali, Kharivali, Pimplas, Saasne, Tilse, Jawahar, Vasuri, Kaambaare, Khuded village, Wada Block, Dist. Palghar, Maharashtra have reaped chemical-free harvest and at enhanced production value compared to that cultivated with chemical fertilizers and pesticides.

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